Lake St Clair

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Lake St Clair

Lake St Clair is one of the jewels within the Cradle Mountain-Lake St Clair National Park, and marks the final destination of the famed Overland Track. The Aboriginal name for Lake St Clair is leeawuleena, meaning ‘sleeping water’, which perfectly describes this ethereal, peaceful place.

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Derwent Bridge

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Derwent Bridge

Derwent Bridge is a small township that lies lies between ethereal Lake Saint Clair and trout-brimming Lake King William in the heart of Tasmania’s Central Highlands. It’s the gateway town to the southern end of the Cradle Mountain-Lake St Clair National Park, and is home to some quaint accomodation and a friendly pub which is a great rest stop.

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Miena Village

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Miena

A popular shack village for holidaying fishing enthusiasts, Miena sits next to Australia’s second largest lake, aptly named Great Lake. Miena Village is also one of the coldest place in Tasmania; snow blankets the area in Winter and cozying up by the fire with a whisky is recommended.

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Russell Falls

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Russell Falls

Take a short, easy bushwalk through a wonderland of cool temperate rainforests up a wandering path that will lead you to the majestic Russell Falls at it’s end. Arguably Southern Tasmania’s favourite waterfall, it’s a place to stop and take a photo and breathe in the beauty that Tasmania’s South has to offer. This track is also home to towering swamp gums, the tallest flowering plant on Earth.

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Strathgordon

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Strathgordon

If you’re heading to Strathgordon you’re not on the way to anywhere else. This is literally the end of the road. Located deep in the Tasmanian wilderness on the shores of Lake Pedder, for those who make it here, it’s worth driving to this far-flung outpost.

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Bothwell

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Bothwell

Bothwell is the gateway to Tasmania’s central highlands and a fine example of Tasmania’s colonial heritage with more than 50 classified buildings. Settled by Scottish pioneer farmers in the early 1820s, the town retains an old-world charm with wide open streets and lovely 19th century buildings clustered around the trees and grass of Queens Park.

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Mount Field

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Mount Field National Park

Mount Field is Tasmania’s most accessible and most loved national park. Just a 90-minute drive from Hobart, the park features a series of beautiful waterfalls and a drive to the summit through sub-alpine and alpine vegetation.

Hamilton

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Hamilton

Settled in 1808, once upon a time there were big plans for National Trust-classified Hamilton. Designs for this frontier town were grand and sandstone buildings that line the main road are evidence of this. In the 1830s a collection of hotels, several breweries and a strong illegal liquor trade kept the town booming, but the small rural farming town of today doesn’t have quite the same hustle and bustle.

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